Anatomy & Physiology

  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Jean Westerman Gregg
    posted 4 years ago
    A paper presented at the Fifth International Congress of Voice Teachers, Helsinki. In conclusion, the author urges, for optimal communication through speech or sing, every speech or voice teacher needs to have complete knowledge of the movements of the muscles in the vocal tract required for the phonological system of the language being sung.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 4 years ago
    From an assumption that far little has been written about the nose, the author discusses its anatomy, nosebleeds, obstruction, fracture, various growths,etc.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 4 years ago
    Much has been written concerning the function of the vocal folds. This article speaks to the function of the vocal fold cells, an aspect about which little has been written.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 4 years ago
    Titze reports on the continuing research into this naturally occurring substance in the body that may one day prove beneficial in distributing moisture evenly over the vocal folds. Promising as this is, the author notes that "we must give voice scientists some time to solve this puzzle." [pp. 51-52]
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Deirdre D. Michael
    posted 4 years ago
    The first of a series of articles, the author wishes to provide facts that can clarify myths about vocal technique or the vocal mechanism. Dr. Michael is Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota Medical School. (For the second installment, see vol. 67, no. 4, March/April 2011: 417-421.)
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Deirdre D. Michael
    posted 4 years ago
    Michael responds to a Letter to the Editor regarding muscle use in breathing.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 4 years ago
    The development of vocal fold tissues to accommodate vibration over large pitch ranges is nothing short of a miracle. An experiment (which cannot be performed) would be to expose one vocal fold of a human being to normal daily vibration from birth to adulthood while preventing the other vocal fold from vibrating at all. We could then answer questions about whether such specialized tissue development is driven purely by the applied forces or partly by genetics.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 4 years ago
    With regard to fundamental frequency, sound level (SL) increases about 6 dB/octave, all else being equal. This is the primary reason why females often outsing males on the opera stage if they sing an octave higher. With regard to lung pressure, SL increases about 6-9 dB/with every doubling of lung pressure. The major phenomenon here is increase in peak glottal airflow. The frequency spectrum affects loudness perception if the sound is more than a simple tone.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Deirdre D. Michael
    posted 4 years ago
    Continuing the series begun in 2010, Michael aims to "clarify misconceptions about vocal production.” In this installment she notes of the titular myth, "Like many of the anatomically incorrect images we use routinely in the studio, this advise is well motivated, but can have unintended consequences.” For part one see 66, no. 5 (547-551); part two 67, no. 4 (417-421); part three 68, 4 (419-425).
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Deirdre D. Michael
    posted 4 years ago
    Continuing the series begun in 2010, Michael aims to "clarify misconceptions about vocal production.” In this installment she addresses three pervasive _myths”: 1) that the vocal folds are "chords” (sic); 2), that one can sing "on” or "off” the cords (sic); and 3), that falsetto is produced with _false vocal folds.” For part one see 66, no. 5 (547-551); part three 68, no. 4 (419-425); part four 69, no. 2 (167-172).
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