Anatomy & Physiology > How the LCA and IA muscles adduct (close) the glottis

How the LCA and IA muscles adduct (close) the glottis

by National Center for Voice and Speech
posted 4 years ago
This very brief (1 minute) video shows a demonstration of the action of the lateral cricoarytenoids and interaryenoids in adducting the vocal folds and closing the posterior glottic gap, using an excised cow larynx. THere is a biref demonstration of both the posterior cricoarytenoid and the cricothyroid muscles.
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    Editor's Review
    Very helpful "3-D" view of anatomy, but the viewer should already be able to identify the laryngeal muscles, or have a diagram nearby, before viewing.

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