Pedagogy

  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by David Meyer
    posted 1 year ago
    This 33 minute tutorial was presented at the Voice Foundation's Annual Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice, in June 2016, by Dr. David Meyer, Professor of Voice at Shenandoah University. This lecture explains the basics of vocal pedagogy, and includes discussion of what the field of vocal pedagogy needs from the field of voice science.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Trish Causey, Jeanette Lovetri, Robert Sataloff, Ingo Titze
    posted 3 years ago
    This article provides an insightful overview of the musical theatre singing voice. Causey introduces experts within the pedagogy field and provides their credentials and professional opinions. Using quotes from each of these professionals, this article presents basic scientific and experiential evidence to explain the importance and necessity of training in the musical theatre style.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Joan Melton
    posted 3 years ago
    In her article; The Technical Core: An Inside View, Joan Melton writes on her research and findings from ultrasound imaging (USI) of abdominal muscle activity while voicing to workshop participants at a conference on Performance Breath, at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, London. Although the study only focused on the core muscular system of the singer the results shed light on some of what is actually happening when a performance breath is taken.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jared L. Trudeau
    posted 3 years ago
    This is actually a thesis that examines the development of voice pedagogy in music theater and specfically examines techniques used for female sopranos and high belters. The author specifically attempts to tackle issues of breath management, vocal health, registration, and other aspects, and focuses specifically on those female singing actresses and roles that often demand a crossover style of singing.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeb Mueller, Jeffrey Stern
    posted 3 years ago
    A well organized, overview of Belting. It begins with a review of the physiology of the voice, then moves into historical context, definitions and their discrepancies, and a discussion of what is actually occuring during belt singing. This presentation is filled with excellent citations and presents the controversies in a well thought out manner. It also discusses whether or not belting is healthy and then strategies for maintaining vocal health for those who teach and perform in this style. As a final thought they quote Barbara Doscher when she states that "our profession has a responsibility to all singers, not just to those whose aesthetic preference we agree with." A starting place for the teacher who is grappling with how to and whether or not to teach those who wish to belt.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Andrew White
    posted 3 years ago
    In this article, Andrew White provides an in-depth description of belting, including the muscles involved, airflow rate, larynx position, and resonance strategies.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 3 years ago
    Jeannette Lovetri provides a great article that explains the term “belt”. She defines it as a “kind of vocal quality, derived from powerful, intensified speech, that can cut through a space and be heard well even when it isn’t electronically amplified.” Lovetri goes on to describe what she feels healthy belting is and what singers need to know about it.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Lisa S. Popeil
    posted 3 years ago
    This article was written from a presentation given at the Voice Foundation's 1999 "Care For The Professional Voice" Symposium in Philadelphia. It compares belt and classical vocal techniques using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), video fluoroscopy, and video laryngoscope on one subject. "The goal of this study was to gain evidence about the relationship between the thyroid and cricoid cartilages and how they might tilt or angle in classical versus belting." Popeil discusses terminology for the belt and the findings of this study.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by The American Academy of Teachers of Singing
    posted 3 years ago
    This often-quoted article presents the history of CCM styles and their development throughout the 20th century along with acoustic comparison of CCM singing with classical as evidence that contemporary singing is fundamentally different from classical and deserves its own pedagogical approach.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 3 years ago
    Jeannette LoVetri provides numerous examples of how CCM singing differs from classical singing. She expands on these ideas in other blog posts titled "More Details About Why CCM Is Different Than Classical" and "Still More About CCM vs Classical." Many of these ideas are further developed in scholarly journal articles Lovetri has authored/co-authored.
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