Pedagogy > Misinterpreting Research

Misinterpreting Research

by Jean Westerman Gregg
posted 7 years ago
It is the responsibility of the speech-language pathologist to determine what muscular patterns and behavioral habits have contributed to a laryngeal disorder. Over the years, certain recurring problems have emerged which might be helpful for the teacher to review.
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