Anatomy & Physiology > Dispelling Vocal Myths. Part 2: "Sing It 'Off' the Chords!

Dispelling Vocal Myths. Part 2: "Sing It 'Off' the Chords!

by Deirdre D. Michael
posted 3 years ago
Continuing the series begun in 2010, Michael aims to "clarify misconceptions about vocal production.” In this installment she addresses three pervasive _myths”: 1) that the vocal folds are "chords” (sic); 2), that one can sing "on” or "off” the cords (sic); and 3), that falsetto is produced with _false vocal folds.” For part one see 66, no. 5 (547-551); part three 68, no. 4 (419-425); part four 69, no. 2 (167-172).
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    Editor's Review
    There are minor inaccuracies in some of the statements regarding measurement of air pressure are written. For example, phonation threshold pressure “is typically calculated from indirect pressure measurements that are made at the lips.” Actually, the measure is made inside the oral cavity, not at the lips, when the smooth /pipipi/ technique is used. In general though, this article provides a clear discussion of numerous basic concepts all voice people should understand, in a manner that is easily understand by novices.
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