Vocal Development and Articulation in Speech and Song

by Jean Westerman Gregg
A paper presented at the Fifth International Congress of Voice Teachers, Helsinki. In conclusion, the author urges, for optimal communication through speech or sing, every speech or voice teacher needs to have complete knowledge of the movements of the muscles in the vocal tract required for the phonological system of the language being sung.
Resource Type: Print
Resource Name: Journal of Singing
Level: Basic

Reviews

Editor's Review
This article provides a good overview tutorial on articulatory movements.
Advanced Search

Categories

Acoustics/Resonance   
Anatomy & Physiology   
Brain & Learning   
Diction   
History of Scientific Study of Voice   
Pedagogy   
Repertoire   
Style/Genre   
Vocal Health and Wellness   

Keywords

Abduct (1)
ACTH (1)
Actors (1)
Adduct (1)
Airway (2)
ALS (1)
Apathy (1)
Attack (1)
Audio (1)
Aural (1)
Belt (7)
BET (1)
Brain (2)
Breath (4)
CAM (3)
Cancer (1)
CCM (25)
Choir (2)
Choral (3)
Cramps (1)
Creak (1)
CT (2)
CVA (1)
Diet (2)
Edema (2)
ENT (1)
Fach (1)
FESS (1)
Filter (1)
fMRI (1)
FNA (1)
FNAB (1)
Formant (13)
Fry (1)
FSH (1)
Garlic (1)
GERD (5)
Glide (1)
Glottis (12)
Goiter (1)
Growl (1)
HPSM (1)
HRT (1)
Hyoid (1)
IA (1)
Injury (1)
IPA (1)
Jazz (1)
Kava (1)
Larynx (18)
LCA (1)
Legato (1)
Lesion (3)
LH (1)
LMA (1)
LPR (2)
LPRD (2)
LSVT (1)
Lungs (1)
Lupron (1)
Mania (1)
MBSR (1)
Mic (2)
MRI (2)
Mucosa (3)
Muscle (4)
Nerves (1)
Nodes (1)
Nodule (1)
Nose (1)
NSAIDS (1)
Onset (2)
Palate (2)
Panic (1)
PCA (1)
Pitch (1)
PMS (2)
Polyp (2)
Polyps (1)
Praat (1)
Prayer (1)
Range (1)
Reflux (11)
Rock (1)
Scale (1)
Scales (1)
Scar (2)
Septum (1)
SGA (1)
SHS (1)
Sighs (1)
Sinus (1)
Sirens (1)
SLP (1)
Strain (1)
Straw (4)
Stress (1)
Stroke (2)
Style (1)
SVS (1)
TA (1)
Timbre (1)
Tongue (3)
Tremor (1)
Trill (1)
Ulcer (1)
URI (1)
Uvula (1)
Velum (1)
Volume (1)
Vowel (4)
Warmup (5)
WHO (1)
Whoop (1)
Yoga (2)