Style/Genre > Why is Vocal Fry Popping Up in Pop Music?

Why is Vocal Fry Popping Up in Pop Music?

by John Nix, MacKenzie Parrott
posted 1 year ago
This 11:26 minute clip was heard on Science Friday on National Public Radio on 5/27/2016. Vocologists John Nix and MacKenzie Parrott provide explanations of the use of vocal fry in pop music, and other genres of singing. This clip includes excerpts of The Star Spangled Banner sung with and without vocal fry. Parrots provides results of the study regarding listener preferences. Scientific explanation of the laryngeal mechanism for vocal fry is minimal.
Resource Type: Audio
Resource Name: National Public Radio
Level: Basic
Category: Style/Genre
Keywords: Vocal fry
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    Editor's Review
    Although the scientific aspect of this discussion of vocal fry (aka glottal fry) is cursory, this resource provides a scholarly introduction to a topic that is currently in the popular literature, and its relevance in singing. The examples are interesting.
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