Pedagogy

  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by David Meyer
    posted 10 months ago
    This 33 minute tutorial was presented at the Voice Foundation's Annual Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice, in June 2016, by Dr. David Meyer, Professor of Voice at Shenandoah University. This lecture explains the basics of vocal pedagogy, and includes discussion of what the field of vocal pedagogy needs from the field of voice science.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Trish Causey, Jeanette Lovetri, Robert Sataloff, Ingo Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    This article provides an insightful overview of the musical theatre singing voice. Causey introduces experts within the pedagogy field and provides their credentials and professional opinions. Using quotes from each of these professionals, this article presents basic scientific and experiential evidence to explain the importance and necessity of training in the musical theatre style.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Joan Melton
    posted 2 years ago
    In her article; The Technical Core: An Inside View, Joan Melton writes on her research and findings from ultrasound imaging (USI) of abdominal muscle activity while voicing to workshop participants at a conference on Performance Breath, at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, London. Although the study only focused on the core muscular system of the singer the results shed light on some of what is actually happening when a performance breath is taken.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jared L. Trudeau
    posted 2 years ago
    This is actually a thesis that examines the development of voice pedagogy in music theater and specfically examines techniques used for female sopranos and high belters. The author specifically attempts to tackle issues of breath management, vocal health, registration, and other aspects, and focuses specifically on those female singing actresses and roles that often demand a crossover style of singing.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeb Mueller, Jeffrey Stern
    posted 2 years ago
    A well organized, overview of Belting. It begins with a review of the physiology of the voice, then moves into historical context, definitions and their discrepancies, and a discussion of what is actually occuring during belt singing. This presentation is filled with excellent citations and presents the controversies in a well thought out manner. It also discusses whether or not belting is healthy and then strategies for maintaining vocal health for those who teach and perform in this style. As a final thought they quote Barbara Doscher when she states that "our profession has a responsibility to all singers, not just to those whose aesthetic preference we agree with." A starting place for the teacher who is grappling with how to and whether or not to teach those who wish to belt.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Andrew White
    posted 2 years ago
    In this article, Andrew White provides an in-depth description of belting, including the muscles involved, airflow rate, larynx position, and resonance strategies.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 2 years ago
    Jeannette Lovetri provides a great article that explains the term “belt”. She defines it as a “kind of vocal quality, derived from powerful, intensified speech, that can cut through a space and be heard well even when it isn’t electronically amplified.” Lovetri goes on to describe what she feels healthy belting is and what singers need to know about it.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Lisa S. Popeil
    posted 2 years ago
    This article was written from a presentation given at the Voice Foundation's 1999 "Care For The Professional Voice" Symposium in Philadelphia. It compares belt and classical vocal techniques using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), video fluoroscopy, and video laryngoscope on one subject. "The goal of this study was to gain evidence about the relationship between the thyroid and cricoid cartilages and how they might tilt or angle in classical versus belting." Popeil discusses terminology for the belt and the findings of this study.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by The American Academy of Teachers of Singing
    posted 2 years ago
    This often-quoted article presents the history of CCM styles and their development throughout the 20th century along with acoustic comparison of CCM singing with classical as evidence that contemporary singing is fundamentally different from classical and deserves its own pedagogical approach.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 2 years ago
    Jeannette LoVetri provides numerous examples of how CCM singing differs from classical singing. She expands on these ideas in other blog posts titled "More Details About Why CCM Is Different Than Classical" and "Still More About CCM vs Classical." Many of these ideas are further developed in scholarly journal articles Lovetri has authored/co-authored.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by E. Björkner
    posted 2 years ago
    This voice science article examines the timbre differences in Musical Theater and Classical Singing. The author examines the different demands of each singer and takes into account microphone usage and the number of weekly performances. Björkner asserts that subglottal pressure is the main player in controlling vocal intensity. Five male opera singers and five mail MT singers were involved in this study, which seeks to determing "voice source characteristics" and formant frequencies at two fundamental frequencies (f0) and over a large dynamic range. Results indicate that MT and opera singers both sing with equally pressed phonation and that the singer's formant plays a large role in classical vs. MT singing.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Maarten Mourik
    posted 2 years ago
    The article explores on the curriculum in a music theater education. It notes on the required skills needed to be fit in such type of musical education which includes mastery in singing, acting and movements as stand-alone skills while integrating and aligning them, hence, basic classes that will provide future performers are needed in any undergraduate music theater programs. Furthermore, it cites on various methods and ideas that will help future performers develop connection and alignment in singing, acting and movements.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by K.S. Hall
    posted 2 years ago
    The purpose of this study is to develop an introductory guide for teaching music theater vocal pedagogy and styles. This guide is intended for experienced classical teachers. The conclusions of the research on mix/belt singing revealed significant differences between music theater vocal pedagogy and classical vocal pedagogy. To aid the classical teachers in learning about music theater vocal pedagogy and styles, the guide details the results of the pedagogical research on mix/belt singing and compares and contrasts the pedagogy to classical singing.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Barbara Wilson Arboleda
    posted 2 years ago
    Speech-language pathologist Barbara Wilson Arboleda discusses healthy ways to strengthen the young singer's voice when singing pop-rock.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Robert Edwin
    posted 2 years ago
    In this article, the author reflects on his article "Are We the National Association of Teachers of Classical Singing?" that appeared in May 1985 issue of "The NATS Bulletin." The focus of the article is how NATS members can address the need for competent and knowledgeable singing instructors among nonclassical singers
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level:
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Robert Edwin
    posted 2 years ago
    Robert Edwin addresses the need for amplification in voice lessons. He discusses some of the struggles new singers will face if they have not worked with a microphone and the specific genres of music that require amplification when performing. Some terms may be very slightly out of date, but an excellent resource.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ken-Ichi Sakakibara, Leonardo Fuks, Hiroshi Imagawa, Niro Tayama,
    posted 2 years ago
    Presents evidence suggesting that a constriction and sympathetic vibration of the aryepiglottic folds is responsible for the distortion in some types of noisy phonation (eg. "growl").
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Richard Miller
    posted 2 years ago
    The question is discussed: how does the technical training of a countertenor differ from that of other male singers? A useful introduction to and overview of the countertenor fach by a respected pedagogue. Some terms on the "legitimacy" of this fach are slightly outdated, but it is a useful article nonetheless.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jean Westerman Gregg
    posted 2 years ago
    It is the responsibility of the speech-language pathologist to determine what muscular patterns and behavioral habits have contributed to a laryngeal disorder. Over the years, certain recurring problems have emerged which might be helpful for the teacher to review.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    The essay sheds light on the ongoing efforts to define what is meant by efficient voice production, that which gives the most output for the least effort. Most pedagogues, clinicians, and voice scientists have wrestled somewhat with this problem because voices are not often big enough or enduring enough for a given vocal task.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by John Nix
    posted 2 years ago
    Vocal fry is a vocal production that is marked by a low fundamental frequency (below 70 Hz), low subglottic pressure, and minimal air flow. This article describes in detail how vocal fry is produced, explores a variety of pedagogical opinions about fry and its utility in the teaching of singing, and provides sample exercises the authors have found successful for addressing specific vocal problems.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Stephen Austin
    posted 2 years ago
    In this article Dr. Austin discusses the importance of eliminating breathiness from the tone of young singers who are interested in the bel canto tradition. The breathy onset is described as the most common fault in young voices. Teaching a ‘neat and clean’ beginning to the sung tone as experienced when one speaks the word ‘awesome’ can lead to a tone that is clear and ringing.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Stephen Austin
    posted 2 years ago
    emailed author for abstract
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Thomas Cleveland
    posted 2 years ago
    It has long been the hallmark of a fine teacher to assign proper vocalises to the student. From a scientific perspective, the messa di voce, staccato and sustaining long phrases are discussed.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Brenda Smith and Robert Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    Choral pedagogy, the newest academic field in performing arts medicine, addresses the need for choral conductors to be better informed about vocal health. Recently, several authors have studied the special issues of choral conducting that can strengthen voices rather than injure them.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Scott McCoy
    posted 2 years ago
    McCoy's training as a choral conductor and his acknowledged status as scholar of voice pedagogy make him the ideal person to negotiate the controversies surrounding the overlapping domains of technique in choral singing and technique in solo singing. This first installment in the series focuses on vibrato; high tessitura and vowels; and stamina in lengthy rehearsals. McCoy believes that choral directors and singing teachers can work together on the many issues this subject raises, noting that “we all have the ultimate goal of making beautiful music.”
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Scott McCoy
    posted 2 years ago
    McCoy's training as a choral conductor and his acknowledged status as scholar of voice pedagogy make him the ideal person to negotiate the controversies surrounding the overlapping domains of technique in choral singing and technique in solo singing. This first installment in the series focuses on vibrato; high tessitura and vowels; and stamina in lengthy rehearsals. McCoy believes that choral directors and singing teachers can work together on the many issues this subject raises, noting that “we all have the ultimate goal of making beautiful music.”
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Thomas F. Cleveland
    posted 2 years ago
    It has long been the hallmark of a fine teacher to assign proper vocalises to the student. From a scientific perspective, the messa di voce, staccato and sustaining long phrases are discussed.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jan Eric Douglas, Joan Patenaude-Yarnell
    posted 2 years ago
    Fresh insight into the teaching of breathing for singing is provided by the two noted pedagogues.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    The value of phonating into a small-diameter straw is explained, a healthy action for the tissues while the abdominal muscles get a good workout.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level:
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    The author provides a brief discussion of the practical application of flow resistant straws.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by John Nix, C. Blake Simpson
    posted 2 years ago
    Many singing teachers, voice therapists, and acting voice teachers employ semi-occluded vocal tract postures in their teaching. Some of these flow-resistant postures are an integral part of what some authorities have referred to as resonant voice training. The practice is discussed at length.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    In addition to aerodynamic considerations, Titze observes, a vocal tract air column that vibrates (up and down) above the vocal folds can create a reactive push and pull on the tissue surfaces so that vocal fold vibration is reinforced a vocal tract that is narrow (semioccluded) in some region along its length (e.g., at the lips or the epiglottis) helps to produce this favorable push-pull.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Rima A. DeFatta, Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    DeFatta and Sataloff explore the scientific studies that have focused on this fundamental component of voice study. While they note that "no consensus can be reached based on available scientific evidence, they suggest that "the continued use of warm-up and cool-down exercises" seems appropriate and prudent.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Bonnie Pomfret
    posted 2 years ago
    Pomfret considers perhaps the most overlooked portion of the voice lesson: the vocalise. Her methodic approach to vocalizing includes considerations of what it means to warm up, what exercises help to accomplish the task, exercises for voice building, and vocalises for special repertoire or voice types.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo R. Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    The exercises given are those that have strong physiologic justification and are prevalent in the majority of studios.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Ingo R. Titze, National Center for Voice and Speech
    posted 2 years ago
    Dr. Titze demonstrates exercises that can be done using the straw. He does not give any explanation of the scientific underpinnings of the semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, and only provides a brief explanation for the purposes of the exercises.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Mary Saunders-Barton
    posted 2 years ago
    This article by Mary Saunders-Barton describes her experiences teaching young musical theatre students non-classical music. She describes the basic fundamental techniques of singing and her technical training theory for both men and women. She describes more in detail the differences of teaching male and female students and gives several spoken and sung exercises to use.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by David Meyer, Matthew Edwards
    posted 2 years ago
    This article uses data to make the point that students trained in current collegiate vocal pedagogy programs may not be prepared for the marketplace in vocal performance. It includes very current information about finances of the music industry.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Bernard Telsey
    posted 2 years ago
    While not strictly a pedagogy article, this gives an excellent primer in the dos and don'ts of auditioning for musical theatre from the most prolific casting director in musical theatre today, including advice on song choices and riffing.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Matt Edwards
    posted 2 years ago
    This article written by Matt Edwards discusses the singers' changing marketplace, and the pedagogy, science and audio technology of contemporary commercial music. He explains the misconceptions that Pop/Rock music is damaging to the voice.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 2 years ago
    This article discusses the differences in laryngeal position, diction, and registration found in CCM and Classical singing.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Jeannette LoVetri
    posted 2 years ago
    This article discusses how the vocal tract is used in different styles of singing. It encourages voice teachers to use style-specific pedagogy with their students.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Joanna Cazden
    posted 2 years ago
    This piece offers practical tips for anxiety management in the specific setting of a music audition: being well-prepared; expecting the unexpected; using mental rehearsal; turning doubts into ambitions; rewarding oneself for the effort; and knowing when to seek deeper counseling. It was written last year at the request of the Majoring in Music website shown, which is aimed at prospective college students.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Maria Argyros
    posted 2 years ago
    This article is a brief description of the work of David Blair McClosky and the techniques for healthy voice use that he developed over 60 years ago. Mr. McClosky was a pioneer in the field of voice science and his work continues to help singers, music teachers, choir directors, and other professional voice users to regain and enhance a healthy voice. This article explains the essence of the techniques which include body alignment, abdominal breathing, balanced onset, and six specific areas of relaxation of the extrinsic muscles. Application of these techniques provide a physiological approach to vocal production that coordinates the body as a vocal instrument.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Category: Pedagogy
    by Nancy Bos
    posted 8 months ago
    This brief article gives an introduction to a growing phenomenon in voice teaching, particularly in collegiate voice - that of teaching transgendered students. Ms. Bos offers practical advice and some further resources.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    Category: Pedagogy
    by John Nix
    posted 9 months ago
    Dr. John Nix addresses the pervasive issue of vibrato use in the vocal studio and choral settings. He begins by defining vibrato and comparing various kinds of functional and non-functional vibrato (healthy vibrato, wobble, bleat or flutter), including the characteristics of each. He also notes that airflow rates for tones with vibrato tend to about 10% greater than tones without vibrato. In Nix’s study of 350 singers, he found that the majority of those who received explicit instruction regarding using vibrato in singing, that instruction came from a voice teacher; in those who received explicit instruction in non-vibrato singing, the majority received it from a choir director. He addresses changing aesthetics with regard to vibrato, and cites several articles from past issues of the Journal of Singing. Nix offers several exercises for developing flexibility in producing vibrato and non-vibrato sounds. He also suggests revisiting the all-too-easily forgotten basic checklist needed for good singing: alignment, breath, vowels, and addressing any visible tension.
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