Vocal Health and Wellness

  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Ingo Titze
    posted 2 years ago
    The author suggests that most confounding problem in dealing with vocal fatigue is not knowing how much voice rest is needed for recovery. Considerable research is ongoing in this area.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Thomas F. Cleveland
    posted 2 years ago
    Helpful axioms are provided that will help the singer budget voice use and save one from costly cancellations or just help preserve vocal health.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Susan Vaughn
    posted 2 years ago
    The author used iterviews with MDs to provide solid information for singers regarding voice care.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert Bastian
    posted 2 years ago
    It is suggested that a diagnostic category termed the vocal overdoer syndrome (VOS) can be of use not only in the voice clinic but also in the singing studio.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by John S. Rubin, Lesley Mathieson, Ed Blake
    posted 2 years ago
    Recently, the importance of posture to well being has become popularized through the works of authors such as Alexander, Pilates, Feldenkrais, and others. Physiotherapy and osteopathy have become integral to the field of sports medicine, and to the rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. Only very recently, however, has consideration of such sciences been applied to voice research and rehabilitation. The authors believe that it is helpful for singers to be familiar with the latest concepts and perspectives on posture from the medical and alternative medical literature.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Christine Isley-Farmer
    posted 2 years ago
    The author addresses, from a practical stand-point, some of the challenges that singers face with regard to establishing the feet and legs as a flexible base of support for singing. She focuses on only a part of the anatomical structure that is used for the singing experience.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level:
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    It is helpful for singing teachers to understand current concepts of the aging process in order to recognize correctable problems early, make appropriate referrals, and begin optimal strategies for building healthier, more beautiful voices.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level:
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    Tools for intervention to slow the effects of aging on the voice are discussed.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Yolanda D. Heman-Ackah, Robert T. Sataloff, Mary J. Hawkshaw, Venu Divi
    posted 2 years ago
    The authors write that maintaining longevity of the voice involves attention to training and proper hygiene of the vocal folds throughout one's career. Daily stretching, attention to diet and hydration and, the use of proper voice technique in all vocal situations are essential components of prolonged vocal health.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert Edwin
    posted 2 years ago
    Now that the leading edge of Baby Boomers has turned 65, voice pedagogy for the aging singer is sure to become a hotter topic in NATS. Edwin_x0090_'s pedagogical advice for working with the older vocalist centers on body position, respiration, audiation, phonation, and resonation. These technical considerations must be coupled with realistic expectations for vocal performance in the later years of one_x0090_s singing life.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Martin L. Spencer
    posted 2 years ago
    Laryngopharyngeal reflux is a common, if not the most common source of laryngeal pathology, and may be a contribution to disorders ranging from slight, but distressing voice change to laryngeal cancer. Causes and treatments of gastric reflux are discussed. The author stresses that antirefluxogenic behavioral and dietary controls should minimize the need for medications, and maximize the intended effect of medications. Readers are strongly advised to seek medical evaluation via endoscopy and evaluations should atypical throat or voice problems persist for longer than several weeks.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    The problem of reflux has become well known among singing teachers. It is worthwhile for singing teacher to recognize that diagnosis and treatment of reflux in singers and other otolaryngology patients remain more controversial than we would like. Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) represents a complex spectrum of pathophysiology, diagnostic challenge and therapeutic controversy. Patient management can be optimized only through excellently designed studies with rigorous inclusion criteria, involving close collaboration among laryngologists, gastroenterologists, research scientists, and reflux surgeons.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Yolanda Heman-Ackah, Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    Vocal fold hypomobility can result from a myriad of disorders of nerves, muscles, or cricoarytenoid joint function. Vocal fold hypomobility may manifest with symptoms that range from breathiness, vocal fatigue, and decreased range to aphonia, aspiration, and shortness of breath.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Blake Simpson, Gayle Woodson
    posted 2 years ago
    Neurological voice disorders are due to abnormalities of the brain and/or the nerves of the body that impair control of the muscles. The more common neurological diseases discussed are strokes, Parkinson's, spasmodic dysphonia, benign essential tremor, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, myasthenia gravis and multiple sclerosis.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    Singing teachers should be familiar with sinusitis, as virtually all will encounter students with sinusitis. Many more students with sinus symptoms actually have allergic rhinitis.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    It is helpful for singing teachers to have a basic familiarity with the nature, evaluation, and treatment of thyroid cancer, a relatively common form of the disease. Normal thyroid hormone levels are important to laryngeal function, so thyroid damage even from medical cancer treatment can cause voice problems in singers, but it will not necessarily end a vocal career.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    by Steven Levy, Mona M. Abaza, Mary J. Hawkshaw, Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    Many medications prescribed commonly by otolaryngologists can cause negative psychiatric side effects. Serious drug interactions from the combination of some of these medications and other psychiatric medications can also occur and are potentially fatal.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Joseph R. Anticaglia, Robert Thayer Sataloff, Mary Hawkshaw
    posted 2 years ago
    Insert Info here
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Jole S. Edman, Lauren B. Kondrad, Birgit Rakel
    posted 2 years ago
    The authors succinctly describe their thesis: "[This study] will discuss the use of nutrition and integrative medicine for singers. In this first article, a definition and categorization of integrative medicines is presented, along with background information on nutrition, herbal medicine, homeopathy, physical fitness, and stress management.” For the second installment, see 68, no. 3 Jan./Feb. 2012 (291-298).
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Jole S. Edman, Lauren B. Kondrad, Birgit Rakel
    posted 2 years ago
    The authors succinctly describe their thesis: "[This study] will discuss the use of nutrition and integrative medicine for singers. In the second article, these approaches will be applied to specific conditions to describe how integrative medicine can be useful for diseases or conditions such as GERD, allergies, URIs, menopausal symptoms, and performance anxiety." For the first installment, see 68, no. 2 Nov./Dec. 2011 (165-173).
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level:
    by Yolanda D. Heman-Ackah
    posted 2 years ago
    Insert abstract here
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Erin Oberlander
    posted 2 years ago
    An exploration of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Voice Syndrome (PMVS) that details the ways in which singers may be physically and emotionally affected. Based on a number of medical studies of the phenomenon, the author provides strategies for students and teachers to address this highly personal subject sensitively and effectively. [pp. 27-34]
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Sameep Kadakia, Dave Carlson, Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    It is important for singers and teachers to be familiar with the body_x0090_s major hormones and their effect on vocal fold function. The authors first focus on aspects of the female voice (such as the effects of the menstrual cycle) and explore issues relevant to all singers, including the effects of thyroid hormones and pituitary gland hormones.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Robert T. Sataloff
    posted 2 years ago
    When selected nonsurgical treatments fail and when a patient remains sufficiently symptomatic to warrant the surgical risks in the opinion of the patient, voice therapist, and laryngologist, meticulous microsurgery usually results in voice improvement. Many abnormalities, as detailed, in the article, do require surgery.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Thomas F. Cleveland
    posted 2 years ago
    The article addresses the several concerns that might confront the singer in vocal fold surgery. Helpful and very informative.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Kari Ragan, Kunal Gangopadhyay
    posted 2 years ago
    "[Intubation] occurs under deep sedation or general anesthesia to maintain/support the airway and to provide a means for oxygenation (oxygen delivery) and mechanical ventilation.” Focusing on short term intubation, less than twenty-four hours in duration, the authors give a wealth of advice for vocal performers, including what questions to ask before the surgery; what to expect in the operating room; and expectations for the postoperative period.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Clark A. Rosen
    posted 2 years ago
    The purpose of the article is to help the individual, teacher, and family member navigate through the vocal health care system. The different types of voice care professionals involved in voice evaluation and treatment are mentioned. A variety of key components of voice evaluation are described as well as assists in providing the reader with a method to find a voice care physician.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Yolanda Heman-Ackah, Robert T. Sataloff, Mary J. Hawkshaw, Venu Divi Corln
    posted 2 years ago
    The article assists singing teachers and others in understanding when a laryngologist (voice specialist) should be consulted, and especially when one should be consulted urgently.
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Basic
    by Deirdre D. Michael, George S. Goding
    posted 2 years ago
    Continuing the series begun in 2010, Michael aims to clarify misconceptions about vocal production. In this installment Michael and Goding examine some myths and truths about vocal fold swelling, particularly as it pertains to upper respiratory infection (URI). For part one see 66, no. 5 (547-551); part two 67, no. 4 (417-421); part four 69, no. 2 (167-172).
  • Resource Type: Print
    Level: Advanced
    by Aaron Ziegler, Michael M. Johns, Laura Jane Miller, Teresa Hopkin, Marina Gilman
    posted 2 years ago
    Rather than a specific set of guidelines for singers to address injury, the authors explore methods of educating students about this topic through classes and seminars. While they describe several viable approaches, they conclude, "more research is necessary to better understand how voice educators can serve the health needs of singing students.”
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Robert T. Sataloff, Mary J. Hawkshaw
    posted 2 years ago
    The authors note, "it is clear from all of the studies to date that singers, and even nonsingers, have a high prevalence of findings [after examination] that physicians would diagnose as abnormalities." They suggest that singers undergo screening while they are healthy to help voice care professionals better assess their condition should an injury occur.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Leezel Tanglao, CBS News
    posted 2 years ago
    This CBS news article summarizes a resaerch study published in the journal PLOS ONE, showing that women who use vocal fry may be perceived negatively when being interviewed for a job. The new article includes an audio clip of Faith Salie, Sunday Morning contributor, discussing vocal fry. Readers are encouraged to read the entire research article, by following the link at CBS News, or given in this database below.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Advanced
    by Rindy C. Anderson, Casey A. Klofstad, William J. Mayew, Mohan Venkatachalam
    posted 2 years ago
    This is a well-done research article showing the effects of vocal fry on listener perceptions. The article includes audio files of speakers producing a sentence with and without vocal fry.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level:
    by Steve Ritch, Maggie McGary
    posted 2 years ago
    This article is not about voice, but provides guidelines for posting personal reviews of resources on Vocapedia.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Bastian Medical Media
    posted 2 years ago
    This 15-minute video is aimed at educating any heavy voice users, such as teachers, singers or actors about vocal swelling and potential injury from over-use. Demonstrations of swelling check exercises are provided, as well the warning signs that are generally associated with vocal injury.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by National Geographic
    posted 2 years ago
    This 10-minute video was produced by National Geographic as part of their ‘Incredible Human Machine’ series. This video focuses on Steven Tyler (of the band Aerosmith), his vocal prowess, and resulting vocal bleed after overuse. The video includes endoscopy of Tyler’s vocal folds, as well as the surgery to treat his vocal bleed.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This webpage provides basic information about a wide variety of voice disorders, and also helps the reader determine if he or she may have a voice disorder. The last part of the page provides information about the process of evaluation and treatment, but the reader is warned that it is specific to the Lions Voice Clinic. This portion unfortunately cannot be separated from the first sections. It is, however, information that is similar across clinics across the country.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This webpage provides basic information about how to maintain good vocal health. While the information is standard, and univeral to almost any credible source about the voice, the reader is warned that there is an advertising aspect for the Lions Voice Clinic that cannot be separated from the rest of the content.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    by James Thomas
    posted 2 years ago
    Laryngoscopy is the art of placing a camera in the throat to view the vocal cords. Important aspects of how to perform the examination, what structures can be seen and how do different areas function are described. A laryngoscopy is the foundation for diagnosing hoarseness or voice problems.
  • Resource Type: Web
    Level: Basic
    by Caroline Holden
    posted 2 years ago
    The Alexander Technique is a practical, well-established, and proven self-help method for relief from chronic pain. It is a tool for renewing freedom of movement, by helping release strain and muscle tension which has built up over time. It is an especially useful tool for singers and actors, and was, in fact, developed over 100 years ago by an actor who was consistently losing his voice.
  • Resource Type: Print
    by Vishay Bhavsar
    posted 2 years ago
    The study analyzes clinical and biomedical evidence for four aspects of vocal hygiene: the promotion of adequate hydration, the avoidance of caffeine intake, the avoidance of milk products, and advocacy of a warm-up before extended periods of voice use.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This brief video shows a stroboscopic laryngeal exam of a female with nodules. Several pitches are produced. It is clear that the nodules prevent vocal fold vibration at a higher pitch.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This audio clip is of a music teacher with scarring of the vocal fold, residual to surgical removal of a vocal fold polyp without adequate post-operative care instructions. Notice how the breathy, strained quality sounds similar to nodules or some other lesion of the vocal folds, reminding us that it is imperative to have a laryngeal examination before trying to treat, or work with, a voice that is obviously disorderd.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This audio clip is of a music teacher with scarring of the vocal fold, residual to surgical removal of a vocal fold polyp without adequate post-operative care instructions. Notice how the breathy, strained quality sounds similar to nodules or some other lesion of the vocal folds, especially with the loss of higher pitches. This reminds us that it is imperative to have a laryngeal examination before trying to treat, or work with, a voice that is obviously disorderd.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This short audio clip is of a middle-aged woman with a vocal fold paralysis. The definition of breathiness is turbulence noise of air escaping through the incompletely closed glottis. This is clearly heard in this sample. You can also hear that she runs out of breath quickly.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This short audio clip is of a high school aged female singer with a vascular (blood filled) lesion of the right vocal fold. The vocal fold is also irregular, swollen and stiff, and therefore does not vibrate well. Because of the irregularity of the vibratory margin of the vocal fold, the glottis does not close completely. The definition of breathiness is turbulence noise of air escaping through the incompletely closed glottis. This can be heard in this sample. You can also hear that she runs out of breath quickly. However, the breathiness is not as severe or apparent as it is in the breathy/paralysis clip. One could think that she is simply using a breathy style in the context of the song, or that she is young and needs to "focus" or "support" the tone. In fact, however, the vocal fold is badly damaged.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This short audio clip is of an adult male professional singer with a complaint of noise in his voice. The listener can hear the mild roughness in the quality. In this case, the laryngeal exam showed there was no lesion, but the vocal folds were "pressed" during phonation; that is, the closed phase of the vibratory cycle was long, and impact of the vocal folds was high. Also, the ventricular folds squeezed together somewhat when the tone became more rough. The resulting quality is known as strain. The "buzzy" quality is the result of a subharmonic, an irregular vibration at a frequency that is lower than the fundamental frequency of vibration. (Remember that the fundamental frequency provides the pitch.) The subharmonic is generated because of the irregular and asymmetrical pressure at the glottis.
  • Resource Type: Audio
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This short audio clip is of an adult male with a vocal fold polyp. The polyp results in irregular vocal fold vibration that results in the perception of roughness. See also the video clip of the same lesion.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video shows a larynx with a hemorrhagic (blood filled, aka vascular) polyp on the right vocal fold. The polyp results in incomplete closure of the glottis, and irregular vibration of the vocal folds. The varies according to pitch and loudness. The video makes it clear why the singing voice quality in the audio clip varies from markedly rough to normal.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video shows the larynx of a college-age singer with a healthy larynx. The vibration is seen as a blur at first, but halfway through, the halogen light is turned off and the strobe (xenon) light is turned on. The stroboscopy gives the optimal illusion of slow-motion vibration, allowing us to see the mucosal wave. Notice the symmetry and regularity of the normal mucosal wave.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx prior to a thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx prior to a thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone. The stroboscopy makes it clear that entrainment is often not achieved, leaving the vocal folds to vibrate separately, often at different frequencies. When the pitch is high enough, and there is enough longitudinal tension along the left vocal fold, the right vocal fold can vibrate against it with adequate regularity to a achieve a stable frequency, although the glottic closure is insufficient for much volume.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx after thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. The improvement with better glottic closure is quite dramatic. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone.
  • Resource Type: Video
    Level: Basic
    by Lions Voice Clinic, University of Minnesota
    posted 2 years ago
    This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx after thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone. The improvement in entrainment provided by the improved glottic closure allows for much more normal vibration of the vocal folds.
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