Common Otolaryngologic Medications: Psychiatric Side Effects

by Steven Levy, Mona M. Abaza, Mary J. Hawkshaw, Robert T. Sataloff
Many medications prescribed commonly by otolaryngologists can cause negative psychiatric side effects. Serious drug interactions from the combination of some of these medications and other psychiatric medications can also occur and are potentially fatal.

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