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This audio clip is of a music teacher with scarring of the vocal fold, residual to surgical removal of a vocal fold polyp without adequate post-operative care instructions. Notice how the breathy, strained quality sounds similar to nodules or some other lesion of the vocal folds, especially with the loss of higher pitches. This reminds us that it is imperative to have a laryngeal examination before trying to treat, or work with, a voice that is obviously disorderd.
This audio clip is of a music teacher with scarring of the vocal fold, residual to surgical removal of a vocal fold polyp without adequate post-operative care instructions. Notice how the breathy, strained quality sounds similar to nodules or some other lesion of the vocal folds, reminding us that it is imperative to have a laryngeal examination before trying to treat, or work with, a voice that is obviously disorderd.
This is a well-done research article showing the effects of vocal fry on listener perceptions. The article includes audio files of speakers producing a sentence with and without vocal fry.
The audio file comes with a graphical representation of the symbols and diacritics in the International Phonetic Alphabet, and audio representations of the phonemes. You just click the sound and the audio plays. There are also audio explanations of various concepts. Quick Time Player is required.
This short audio clip is of an adult male professional singer with a complaint of noise in his voice. The listener can hear the mild roughness in the quality. In this case, the laryngeal exam showed there was no lesion, but the vocal folds were "pressed" during phonation; that is, the closed phase of the vibratory cycle was long, and impact of the vocal folds was high. Also, the ventricular folds squeezed together somewhat when the tone became more rough. The resulting quality is known as strain. The "buzzy" quality is the result of a subharmonic, an irregular vibration at a frequency that is lower than the fundamental frequency of vibration. (Remember that the fundamental frequency provides the pitch.) The subharmonic is generated because of the irregular and asymmetrical pressure at the glottis.
This short audio clip is of a high school aged female singer with a vascular (blood filled) lesion of the right vocal fold. The vocal fold is also irregular, swollen and stiff, and therefore does not vibrate well. Because of the irregularity of the vibratory margin of the vocal fold, the glottis does not close completely. The definition of breathiness is turbulence noise of air escaping through the incompletely closed glottis. This can be heard in this sample. You can also hear that she runs out of breath quickly. However, the breathiness is not as severe or apparent as it is in the breathy/paralysis clip. One could think that she is simply using a breathy style in the context of the song, or that she is young and needs to "focus" or "support" the tone. In fact, however, the vocal fold is badly damaged.
This 11:26 minute clip was heard on Science Friday on National Public Radio on 5/27/2016. Vocologists John Nix and MacKenzie Parrott provide explanations of the use of vocal fry in pop music, and other genres of singing. This clip includes excerpts of The Star Spangled Banner sung with and without vocal fry. Parrots provides results of the study regarding listener preferences. Scientific explanation of the laryngeal mechanism for vocal fry is minimal.
This short audio clip is of an adult male with a vocal fold polyp. The polyp results in irregular vocal fold vibration that results in the perception of roughness. See also the video clip of the same lesion.
This short audio clip is of a middle-aged woman with a vocal fold paralysis. The definition of breathiness is turbulence noise of air escaping through the incompletely closed glottis. This is clearly heard in this sample. You can also hear that she runs out of breath quickly.
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