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This very short video shows a 3-D representation of the diaphragm's movement during respiration.
This 15-minute video uses models, diagrams and several endoscopy videos to demonstrate the anatomy and phyisology of the vocal tract, touching briefly on the airway's role in swallowing and focusing primarily on speech. Endoscopy videos are included, showing the difference between healthy and damaged vocal folds.
This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx prior to a thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone. The stroboscopy makes it clear that entrainment is often not achieved, leaving the vocal folds to vibrate separately, often at different frequencies. When the pitch is high enough, and there is enough longitudinal tension along the left vocal fold, the right vocal fold can vibrate against it with adequate regularity to a achieve a stable frequency, although the glottic closure is insufficient for much volume.
This 6-minute video uses 3-D computer graphics to give a clear basic introduction to the muscles attached to the hyoid bone and tongue. It does not cover the intrinsic muscles of the tongue.
This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx after thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. The improvement with better glottic closure is quite dramatic. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone.
This video shows a larynx with a hemorrhagic (blood filled, aka vascular) polyp on the right vocal fold. The polyp results in incomplete closure of the glottis, and irregular vibration of the vocal folds. The varies according to pitch and loudness. The video makes it clear why the singing voice quality in the audio clip varies from markedly rough to normal.
This 90-minute video shows a presentation given by Dr. Robert Sataloff at the 2008 National Conference of the National Association of Teachers of Singing. It provides a basic overview of essentials of anatomy and physiology that singing teachers should understand, as well as an overview of medical conditions that affect the voice, and basic concepts of evaluation and treatment.
This CBS news article summarizes a resaerch study published in the journal PLOS ONE, showing that women who use vocal fry may be perceived negatively when being interviewed for a job. The new article includes an audio clip of Faith Salie, Sunday Morning contributor, discussing vocal fry. Readers are encouraged to read the entire research article, by following the link at CBS News, or given in this database below.
This brief video shows a stroboscopic laryngeal exam of a female with nodules. Several pitches are produced. It is clear that the nodules prevent vocal fold vibration at a higher pitch.
This 8-minute video uses 3-D computer graphics to give a clear basic introduction to the muscles attached to the cricoid cartilage.
This 15-minute video is aimed at educating any heavy voice users, such as teachers, singers or actors about vocal swelling and potential injury from over-use. Demonstrations of swelling check exercises are provided, as well the warning signs that are generally associated with vocal injury.
This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx prior to a thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone.
This 12-minute video uses 3-D computer graphics to elucidate the cartilagenous framework of the larynx, including the muscular attachments.
This video is one of four in a series showing the larynx of an adult female with a left vocal fold paresis (incomplete paralysis). Note that the left vocal fold does move slightly, but is very limited compared to the right. The paresis results in weak glottic closure, which prevents normal vocal fold vibration. This video shows the larynx after thyroplasty, that is, surgical placement of an implant that provides improved glottic closure and therefore better vibration. This series of videos provides a good demonstration of the concept of entrainment, in which the vocal folds become "entrained" in the airstream to vibrate, as long as they are close enough together, and have similar underlying muscle tone. The improvement in entrainment provided by the improved glottic closure allows for much more normal vibration of the vocal folds.
This video shows the larynx of a college-age singer with a healthy larynx. The vibration is seen as a blur at first, but halfway through, the halogen light is turned off and the strobe (xenon) light is turned on. The stroboscopy gives the optimal illusion of slow-motion vibration, allowing us to see the mucosal wave. Notice the symmetry and regularity of the normal mucosal wave.
This very brief (1 minute) video shows a demonstration of the action of the lateral cricoarytenoids and interaryenoids in adducting the vocal folds and closing the posterior glottic gap, using an excised cow larynx. THere is a biref demonstration of both the posterior cricoarytenoid and the cricothyroid muscles.
Dr. Titze and other experts explain vocal production by means of analogies to how a car works. This is highly simplified, but graphics are helpful. A highlight is a famous movie scene, in which the voice signal sounds as it would without the filtering of the vocal tract.
This very short video clip shows the larynx during laughter.
This very brief (1 minute) video shows a demonstration of the action of the cricothyroid muscle in elongating and thinning the vocal folds, using an excised cow larynx.
This 15-minute video provides an in-depth, 3-D description of the mucosa of the larynx, and helpful breakdown of the vestibule, "true" and "false" vocal folds.
Dr. Titze demonstrates exercises that can be done using the straw. He does not give any explanation of the scientific underpinnings of the semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, and only provides a brief explanation for the purposes of the exercises.
This very short video clip shows the larynx during whistling
This 10-minute video was produced by National Geographic as part of their ‘Incredible Human Machine’ series. This video focuses on Steven Tyler (of the band Aerosmith), his vocal prowess, and resulting vocal bleed after overuse. The video includes endoscopy of Tyler’s vocal folds, as well as the surgery to treat his vocal bleed.
This 10-minute video provides an explanation of muscle function of the vocal tract using 3-D computer graphics. This video covers muscle functions at the most basic and fundamental level.
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